Skip links and keyboard navigation

    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection
    The Honourable Andrew Powell

    Celebrating 20 years of heritage protection in Charleville

    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection
    The Honourable Andrew Powell

    Thursday, August 23, 2012

    Celebrating 20 years of heritage protection in Charleville

    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection, Andrew Powell, has joined with Chair of the Queensland Heritage Council this week to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the said the Queensland Heritage Act.

    Minister Powell said the heritage values of five places in Charleville have been protected by Queensland’s Heritage Act over the past 20 years

    “In Charleville, 5 places have been entered in the Queensland Heritage Register since the legislation was introduced including Charleville Railway station, Queensland National Bank, Charleville War Memorial, Landsborough’s Blazed Tree at Camp 67, and the Hotel Corones,” Mr Powell said.

    “Built by Harry “Poppa” Corones during the economic boom of the 1920s, the Corones Hotel has become one of Charleville’s most recognisable buildings.

    “The hotel became a symbol of both the prosperity and changing fortunes of the town and pastoral industry it served,” he said.

    “The blazed tree at Camp 67, just south of Charleville, is a heritage landmark that is significant for its association with the first north-south crossing of the continent.

    “The tree was marked during William Landsborough's 1862 expedition south from the Gulf of Carpentaria in search of cross-continent explorers Robert O'Hara Burke and William Wills,” Mr Powell said.

    Queensland Heritage Council (QHC) Chair, Professor Peter Coaldrake, said the Queensland Heritage Act 1992 formally recognised the significance of the State’s heritage in a legal sense and also within the community.

    “The advent of heritage legislation in Queensland 20 years ago coincided with our coming of age,” Professor Coaldrake said.

    “Queenslanders understand how important it is to protect the historical markers that define our story.”

    The Queensland Heritage Act established the independent Queensland Heritage Council and the Queensland Heritage Register.

    “Some 1600 places throughout Queensland have been entered in the Queensland Heritage Register since it was established in 1992,” Professor Coaldrake said.

    “Many of the places on the Queensland Heritage Register would have been lost without the protection afforded by the Queensland Heritage Act.”

    For more information about heritage listed places, visit the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection website and search the Queensland Heritage Register at < http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/heritage/index.html

    ENDS-

    Media contact: Alex Bernard 0417 252 563