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    JOINT STATEMENT
    Attorney-General, Minister for Local Government and Special Minister of State
    The Honourable Paul Lucas
    Environment
    The Honourable Vicky Darling

    Councils, industry well aware of Coastal Plan

    JOINT STATEMENT

    Attorney-General, Minister for Local Government and Special Minister of State
    The Honourable Paul Lucas

    Environment
    The Honourable Vicky Darling

    Tuesday, January 31, 2012

    Councils, industry well aware of Coastal Plan

    The Queensland Coastal Plan – which protects the state’s most vulnerable coastal land from future urban development – should come as no surprise to councils and the property industry.

    Environment Minister Vicky Darling and Local Government Minister Paul Lucas said the plan was jointly launched by the State Government and the Local Government Association of Queensland on April 7, 2011.

    “More than ever, we saw the need for a coastal management plan during the natural disasters of last summer,” Ms Darling said.

    “The predictions of climate scientists who tell us to expect more severe extreme weather events cannot be ignored.

    “I question whether councils would really be representing their ratepayers if they ignored the science of climate change and its impacts by letting developers have their way in these sensitive areas?

    “There is no room for complacency when planning for Queensland’s long-term future and we need to confront these challenges now. The Queensland Coastal Plan will:

    • protect future coastal communities from threats such as storm tide surges, such as cyclones
    • protect Queensland’s precious coastline from development in high risk areas of coastal erosion and storm tide inundation caused by climate change
    • safeguard areas of high ecological significance from development

    “We are not banning development in areas that were flooded – we’re ensuring development, in areas subject to increasing threats like coastal erosion and tidal surges, has appropriate mitigation strategies in place.

    “Contrary to developer groups’ claims, existing developer rights are not impacted by this plan.”

    Local Government Minister Paul Lucas questioned why LGAQ were suddenly turning their backs on the plan.

    “The LGAQ might want to put lives at risk but the State Government won’t.

    “Both councils and the property industry have had more than two years to work with the Government on forming the plan.

    “The time for talking is over.

    “LGAQ have never raised concerns about training for Local Governments – and in fact supported extensive workshops with local governments undertaken last year.

    “The draft plan was released more than two years ago and subsequently launched in April last year hand in hand with LGAQ.

    At the time (7 April 2011) LGAQ General Manager Greg Hoffman said:

    “...councils looked forward to working with the State Government to protect the coast from the long-term impacts of climate change, as well as the LGAQ’s Coastal Councils Adaptation Taskforce, which will provide expert advice on responsible coastal planning and compliance.

    “The projected increase in the extent and severity of coastal hazards needs to be dealt with by local councils consistently and transparently. The Coastal Plan provides the policy and supporting tools we need to do that.

    “It also provides the legal support to help make the difficult decisions ahead, as well as a solid base to plan for the next 100 years.”

    “So let’s get on with it and act now for future generations,” Mr Lucas said.

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