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    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Attorney-General and Minister for Industrial Relations
    The Honourable Cameron Dick

    Fine dodgers paying up in record numbers

    Attorney-General and Minister for Industrial Relations
    The Honourable Cameron Dick

    Wednesday, April 14, 2010

    Fine dodgers paying up in record numbers

    Fine dodgers paid up in record numbers in March, a sign the Bligh Government’s tough new fine collection laws are working.

    Attorney-General Cameron Dick said March 2010 was the State Penalties Enforcement Registry’s (SPER) highest recorded collection month in its history.

    “Last month SPER collected a record $15.6 million—the first time SPER has cracked the $15 million mark, beating the previous monthly record set in July 2009 by $1 million,” he said.

    “This is no coincidence—this increase is directly related to the impact of the Bligh Government’s tough new laws.

    “Fine dodgers are getting the message. Queenslanders expect people who break the law and receive a fine to pay their debt in full.”

    The tough new laws which came into effect on 1 January target chronic fine dodgers by increasing SPER’s enforcement powers, allowing them to clamp wheels, seize property and suspend driver licences for fines relating to all offences, not just motor-vehicle-related offences.

    “Since I announced these tough new measures in July, the average monthly collection has been $13.5 million, an increase of $1.6 million over last year’s monthly average.”

    “The publicity surrounding the new laws has certainly prompted debtors into paying their fines.

    “The vehicle immobilisation trial has netted $380 000 in direct payments and resulted in $3.2 million of debts coming into compliance since 1 January 2010. The early indicators suggest the new laws are having the desired effect.

    “It’s unfortunate that it takes the threat of having a licence suspended or wheels clamped for people to do the right thing and pay their fines.”

    Mr Dick said SPER would continue to investigate chronic fine dodgers and use all enforcement opportunities available to make them comply.

    “Debtors referred to SPER are given plenty of opportunities to pay their fines, including through installment plans,” he said.

    “Debtors intent on not paying their fines face real consequences. If you have unpaid fines I suggest you contact SPER and discuss your repayment options before it’s too late.

    “The message is clear – pay your fines or lose your wheels or your licence.”

    Media contact:
    Office of the Attorney-General and Minister for Industrial Relations 3239 3487