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    JOINT STATEMENT
    Premier
    The Honourable Anna Bligh
    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister Assisting the Premier in Western Queensland
    The Honourable Kerry Shine

    QLD Gets Tougher on Drug Laws

    JOINT STATEMENT

    Premier
    The Honourable Anna Bligh

    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister Assisting the Premier in Western Queensland
    The Honourable Kerry Shine

    Monday, November 12, 2007

    QLD Gets Tougher on Drug Laws

    State Cabinet has today approved proposed amendments to the Drugs Misuse Act which will strengthen Queensland’s drug laws and provide increased maximum penalties for unlawful possession, supply and trafficking for a range of dangerous drugs.

    Premier Anna Bligh said the Drugs Misuse Amendment Bill 2007 will mean maximum penalties for unlawful possession, supply and trafficking of ‘ecstasy’ (MDMA) and ‘death’ (PMA) will be increased from 20 to 25 years.
    “Under the Bill the Schedule 2 drugs ‘ecstasy’ and ‘death’ will be reclassified as Schedule 1 drugs which carry the greater penalties,” Ms Bligh said.

    “Valium and Serapax as well as all drugs previously in Schedule 2A of the laws, such as steroids, Rohypnol (known as Flunitrazepam) and ephedrine, would be added to Schedule 2, which carries a maximum penalty of 20 years’ jail for unlawful possession, supply or trafficking.”

    Under Schedule 2A of the Drugs Misuse Regulation, the maximum penalty is five years jail and two years’ imprisonment for unlawful possession.

    Ms Bligh said the Bill will also introduce new offences to assist in the prosecution of people illegally manufacturing drugs, such as “ice”.

    “We will be creating new offences for the supply and production of substances, such as pseudoephedrine, and equipment used in the production of dangerous drugs like pill presses,” she said.

    Attorney-General Kerry Shine said in addition to reclassifying a range of dangerous drugs, the Government will introduce a new concept of ‘analogue’ into the Act.

    “It will mean drugs which are not named in the Schedules, but have similar structure and pharmacological effect, will attract the same penalties. Similar provisions already exist in South Australia and the Northern Territory,” Mr Shine said.

    The Bill will also legislate the current voluntary practice of chemical suppliers to provide information on sales of certain categories of drugs and chemicals.

    Media Contact:
    Premier's Office: 3224 4500
    Minister's Office: 3239 3478