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    Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef, Minister for Science and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Leeanne Enoch

    Man fined $1800 for interfering with a crocodile trap

    Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef, Minister for Science and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Leeanne Enoch

    Friday, April 13, 2018

    Man fined $1800 for interfering with a crocodile trap

    Minister for Environment Leeanne Enoch has thanked Queensland Police and wildlife officers for their efforts in investigating a man who was caught tampering with a crocodile trap in Port Douglas.

    In October last year the man was photographed climbing in and around a trap that had been deployed to remove a problem crocodile that had been sighted in the Dicksons Inlet area at Port Douglas.

    Following an extensive investigation, the man was charged with four offences, including interfering with or damaging a crocodile trap.

    The man pleaded guilty to all of the charges and was fined $1800 in Caboolture Magistrates Court last month and a conviction was recorded.

    Ms Enoch said the man’s behaviour was dangerous.

    “These traps are specifically designed to attract crocodiles and they are deployed in places where a problem crocodile is known to be present,” Ms Enoch said.

    “It is extremely dangerous to interfere with a crocodile trap, regardless of whether or not there is a crocodile inside.

    “It is not an exaggeration to say that interfering with crocodile traps is potentially life-threatening.

    “It also places the general public at risk if the trap is tampered with in such a way that the trap no longer works, which hampers the ability of the Department of Environment and Science to deliver its important public safety role.”

    Ms Enoch thanked police and wildlife officers who had worked on this investigation.

    “The outcome of this investigation is a reminder to everyone that tampering with croc traps is not only dangerous but illegal,” she said.

    “It should go without saying that if a crocodile trap has been deployed it is because there is a crocodile in the vicinity that needs to be removed, so the best advice would be to leave the trap alone and exercise Crocwise behaviour.”

    Ms Enoch said it was important to always be Crocwise in Croc Country. In particular:

    • Expect crocodiles in ALL northern Queensland waterways even if there is no warning sign     
    • Obey all warning signs – they are there to keep you safe
    • Be aware crocs also swim in the ocean and be extra cautious around water at night
    • Stand back from the water’s edge when fishing and don’t wade in to retrieve a lure
    • Camp at least 50 metres from the edge of the water 
    • Never leave food, fish scraps or bait near water, camp site or boat ramp
    • Never provoke, harass or feed crocs

    Anyone who sees a crocodile should report the sighting to the Department of Environment and Science on 1300 130 372. The department investigates all crocodile reports it receives.

    More information on being Crocwise is available: http://www.DES.qld.gov.au/wildlife/livingwith/crocodiles/crocodiles__be_croc_wise.html

     

    Media contact: 0437 859 987