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    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef, Minister for Science and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Leeanne Enoch

    10 million containers returned through Containers for Change

    Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef, Minister for Science and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Leeanne Enoch

    Monday, November 12, 2018

    10 million containers returned through Containers for Change

    Queensland is turning the tide on recycling, with figures revealing more than 10 million containers have now been returned through Containers for Change.

    In marking National Recycling Week today, Minister for Environment and the Great Barrier Reef Leeanne Enoch said Queenslanders were embracing recycling through the container refund scheme.

    “Containers for Change started less than a fortnight ago, and we are seeing some amazing recycling results,” Ms Enoch said.

    “With more than 10 million containers being recycled, this means more than $1 million has gone back to Queenslanders and charities.

    “These results are astounding and goes to show that Queenslanders are embracing the incentive to get cash back for recycling containers.

    “This is also just the beginning of the scheme, and these figures will continue to grow as more Queenslanders get on board.”

    Minister Enoch said this week – National Recycling Week – was a timely reminder for Queenslanders to consider how we can better manage waste.

    “One of the reasons Queensland’s container refund scheme is so important is because Queensland has one of the lowest recycling rates in Australia,” she said.

    “Currently, Queenslanders send about 55% of waste to landfill - this equates to more than 5 million tonnes of waste.

    “But thanks to incentives like Containers for Change, we can change this.”

    Ms Enoch said other ways Queenslanders can improve recycling is through education.

    “People can take advantage of their local council’s kerbside and community drop-off collection systems.

    “There are also websites like Planet Ark that provide details on where people can recycle items like computers, phones, paint, and white goods.

    “At home, people can recycle kitchen and garden scraps as compost, or take up a green waste collection service, either with a private company or one offered by some local governments.

    “You can also collect your soft ‘scrunchable’ plastics and drop them into a REDcycle bin at your nearest participating supermarket.”

    Ms Enoch said every recycling action, big or small, was creating real change for the environment.

    “Help Queensland turn the tide on recycling and encourage your friends and family to get involved in recycling at home, at school and in the workplace.”

    For more information on Containers for Change and to find your nearest refund point, visit https://www.containersforchange.com.au/ or call 13 42 42.

     

    Media contact: 0437 859 987