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    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Transport and Main Roads
    The Honourable Mark Bailey

    Medic trial to reduce wait times for rail incidents

    Minister for Transport and Main Roads
    The Honourable Mark Bailey

    Wednesday, October 31, 2018

    Medic trial to reduce wait times for rail incidents

    A Queensland Rail trial will see medics on standby at inner-city train stations to limit service interruptions and reduce peak commute times.

    Minister for Transport and Main Roads Mark Bailey said the three-month trial, which started this week, would see trained medics stationed at Roma Street, Central, Fortitude Valley and Bowen Hills stations during the morning peak to provide timely assistance to customers in the event of medical incidents.

    “In 2017, Queensland Rail recorded 400 medical incidents at its South East Queensland train stations. At the CBD stations alone, medical incidents over this period resulted in approximately 1500 minutes in delays while staff organised medical assistance for the customer involved,” Mr Bailey said.

     “With more than 53 million customer movements through South East Queensland train stations yearly, we often see customers experience illness, medical conditions or a slip, trip or fall injuries.

    “To help reduce medical related delays and improve customer safety throughout the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, Queensland Rail contracted medical services to its inner-city, Beenleigh and Gold Coast line stations over the 12-day period.

    “This exercise proved extremely beneficial during the major event, with a number of medical incidents able to be addressed within three minutes.

    “Queensland Rail has since identified stations that have been most impacted by medical incidents in the past year and will now initially trial having medical staff on-call during the morning peak at Roma Street, Central, Fortitude Valley and Bowen Hills stations.

    Over the course of the trial, medics may be reallocated to other stations, such as Eagle Junction and Park Road to assess the concept at other network locations.

    “If a medical incident occurs, station-based medics will be able to safely and quickly provide first aid and assist Queensland Ambulance Service and other emergency services when they arrive, streamlining the handover process.

    “This will complement Queensland Rail’s existing first aid protocols.

    Minister Bailey said Queensland Rail had appointed Queensland-based specialist medical services 1300 Medics to deliver the trial.

    “1300 Medics have a proven track record providing medical staff for large-scale events across the state, including the Commonwealth Games, where their trained medics provided critical first aid for games patrons in a variety of scenarios,” Mr Bailey said.

    “It’s an exciting and valuable trial for rail customers, and it’s great to be able to partner with a Queensland business to help deliver it.

    “This trial will not only help provide important medical treatment for injured customers, but it will also address any potential delays, with medics on-hand to look after ill or injured commuters, while allowing services to resume.”

    Queensland Rail will monitor and evaluate the trial over the three month period and medical staff will be fully trained and familiarised with the rail environment.

    ENDS