Skip links and keyboard navigation

    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Employment and Industrial Relations, Minister for Racing and Minister for Multicultural Affairs
    The Honourable Grace Grace

    Queensland's Mental Health Ambassador asks R U OK?

    Minister for Employment and Industrial Relations, Minister for Racing and Minister for Multicultural Affairs
    The Honourable Grace Grace

    Thursday, September 14, 2017

    Queensland's Mental Health Ambassador asks R U OK?

    On the day dedicated to reminding everyone it’s okay to ask, “are you okay?” and support those struggling with life, Queensland’s Mental Health Ambassador Libby Trickett has gone one step further. 

    Sharing her personal experience with mental health issues, the four-time Olympic gold medal swimmer used R U OK? Day to reiterate that it’s ‘OK to not be OK.’ 

    Industrial Relations Minister Grace Grace said as Queensland’s Mental Health Ambassador the former darling of the pool travels all around the state speaking about her battles with depression and raising awareness of the importance of asking for help. 

    “Libby is passionate about promoting positive mental health,” Ms Grace said. 

    “She came on board to help the Queensland Government raise awareness of mental health issues, particularly at the workplace. 

    “We know that employers are well placed to support those who may be doing it tough, not only by providing a work environment that protects their staff from psychological injury, but by creating a workplace culture that encourages people to look after each other.” 

    As an ambassador for the Black Dog Institute, R U OK? and the Queensland Government, Libby Trickett today shared her story with employees at WorkCover Queensland. 

    “Sadly, one in five workers is affected by mental health issues and every year, the cost to the economy is more than $11 billion.

    “But it’s more than just the financial cost – it’s the personal cost – to the individual themselves and to their families. 

    “It’s hard to believe, but over 600 Queenslanders, across all ages and circumstances, commit suicide, and many more attempt it every year. 

    “And when someone is driven to take their own life, the cost to family, friends, colleagues and the community is nothing short of devastating. 

    “Tackling mental health issues requires actions across many sectors, at all levels of government and across the community. We can all do our part,” Libby said. 

    “The RU OK message is for all of us – we just have to Ask; Listen; Encourage action; and Check in. This is so important because often, the hurt can’t be seen,” Ms Grace said. 

    Media contact: Martin Philip 0427 919 548