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    Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Rural Economic Development
    The Honourable Bill Byrne

    Landmark legislation opens markets for Queensland horticulture

    Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries and Minister for Rural Economic Development
    The Honourable Bill Byrne

    Thursday, March 23, 2017

    Landmark legislation opens markets for Queensland horticulture

    The Palaszczuk Government has paved the way for Queensland’s agricultural and forestry industries to access domestic markets more efficiently and cost-effectively with changes to legislation that passed through Parliament this week.

    Amendments to the Biosecurity Act 2014 will allow industry bodies and other non‑government entities to establish approved third party accreditation schemes for certifying primary produce consigned to interstate markets.

    Queensland produce headed for interstate markets needs to meet the quarantine entry requirements specified for that jurisdiction.

    For example, fruit fly host produce entering South Australia, Tasmania or Western Australia from Queensland must be certified as being treated or in a condition that ensures it is free from Queensland fruit fly.

    “We have listened to industry and provided a mechanism for the recognition of third party accreditation schemes for certifying produce,” Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries Bill Byrne said.

    “One example is BioSecure HACCP, which has been developed by the Nursery and Garden Industry Australia over the past decade.

    “This is a big step forward for Queensland’s biosecurity system, and sets a model for other states and territories to follow,” Minister Byrne said.

    Once approved as a biosecurity accreditation scheme under the Act, the Nursery and Garden Industry Australia (NGIA) will be able to use BioSecure HACCP to accredit nursery and other businesses to issue biosecurity certificates, audit those businesses to ensure they are meeting requirements, and suspend, amend and cancel accreditations where there is evidence of non-compliance.

    The NGIA will also be able to develop new and innovative certification procedures that better meet the needs of industry provided they can demonstrate they will consistently meet the requirements of the receiving state or territory.

    Once accredited under a scheme such as BioSecure HACCP, businesses will be able to issue biosecurity certificates that verify produce consigned to interstate markets meets relevant quarantine entry requirements.

    “Industry-led accreditation schemes are recognised as being an important part of the future of the biosecurity assurance system,” Minister Byrne said

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