Skip links and keyboard navigation

    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Rare grassland and other significant habitats added to Bunya Mountains National Park

    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Friday, February 17, 2017

    Rare grassland and other significant habitats added to Bunya Mountains National Park

    Range-top grasslands are a major part of a 52 hectare block that has been added to Queensland’s second-oldest national park, Bunya Mountains, about 200km northwest of Brisbane.

    National Parks Minister Dr Steven Miles said the steep block at the southern boundary of the park had high conservation values and cost the Queensland Government $214,500.

    “The Palaszczuk Government is committed to enhancing the state’s protected area estate, and one way of achieving this is to purchase suitable lands as they come onto the market,” Dr Miles said.

    “Aside from its ‘grassy balds’ that are unique to the Bunya Mountains and some special rainforest areas, the block contains koala habitat and a legless lizard, the collared delma.

    “Adding this block will also help Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service consolidate the management of the park.

    “The added block is surrounded by national park on three sides. It adjoins Bunya Mountains Road, and is on the left after you leave the Dandabah camping area and head back to Dalby.

    “The former owners had kept the land well-vegetated – there are areas of eucalypt forest, rainforest with hoop pines and bunya pines, and the natural grasslands ­– and they were keen to see it become part of the national park.

    “Given the variety of vegetation and terrain, it’s already a popular spot for birdwatchers. They come looking for wedge-tailed eagles and other raptors soaring over the hills, finches in the grassland, and rainforest birds.

    “The high parts provide spectacular views of the Bunya Mountains and surrounding landscape,” Dr Miles said.

    The Bunya Mountains are an island of green rising up from the plains between Dalby and Kingaroy, and have been an important gathering place for Aboriginal people from across south-east Queensland.

    The national park was declared in 1908, straight after Queensland’s first national park, the relatively tiny Witches Falls at Mt Tamborine. It was the state’s first park of substantial size.

    “The park’s last extension was in 2014 when 263 hectares was added. The new addition of 52 hectares gives it a total area of 19,545 hectares,” Dr Miles said.

    Bunya Mountains National Park, reached via steep winding roads, is a cool retreat much loved for its panoramic views, ancient bunya pines, rainforest walks, waterfalls, grassy balds and colourful birdlife.

    The Bunyas are popular for weekend getaways at the three QPWS campgrounds or in nearby cosy cabins and large family-oriented houses on private land. More information: http://www.npsr.qld.gov.au/parks/bunya-mountains/about.html

    ENDS

    MEDIA 0412 393 909