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    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    JOINT STATEMENT
    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister for Training and Skills
    The Honourable Yvette D'Ath

    “No body, no parole” to become law in Queensland: Palaszczuk

    JOINT STATEMENT

    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk

    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister for Training and Skills
    The Honourable Yvette D'Ath

    Thursday, February 16, 2017

    “No body, no parole” to become law in Queensland: Palaszczuk

    The Palaszczuk Government will introduce ‘no body no parole’ legislation to help victims’ families and provide an incentive for offenders to cooperate with authorities.

    The laws would apply to offenders convicted of murder or manslaughter.

    Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the Sofronoff review recommended a model similar to South Australia, which focused broadly on prisoners cooperating with investigations.

    “We have accepted the recommendation to introduce legislation this year to empower the Parole Board to not release the prisoner on parole if the prisoner hasn’t cooperated in the investigation,” she said.

    “We agree with the findings of the Sofronoff review that ‘withholding the location of a body extends the suffering of victim’s families and all efforts should be made to attempt to minimise this sorrow’,” the Premier said.

    Mr Sofronoff met with Fiona Splitt and discussed the hardship that she has faced because she was unable to put her husband to rest. Her husband Bruce Schuler went missing in July 2012 at Palmerville Station on Cape York. The station’s leaseholders Stephen Struber and Dianne Wilson were convicted of his murder. Mr Schuler’s body has not been found.

    The Sofronoff review found:

    “The ‘no body, no parole’ legislation is designed to help victims’ families and to provide a strong incentive for offenders to cooperate with authorities. A system similar to South Australia’s, which focuses more broadly on cooperation with the investigation, has the potential to provide more benefit to the community in incentivising cooperation of all kinds.”

    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath said she would be introducing ‘no body, no parole’ legislation later this year.

    “We know there are a number of jurisdictions across Australia which have legislation, or are in the process of introducing similar legislation.

    “We will consult with stakeholders on the drafting of the legislation.”