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    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    JOINT STATEMENT
    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister for Training and Skills
    The Honourable Yvette D'Ath

    Australia’s toughest laws to tackle serious organised crime

    JOINT STATEMENT

    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk

    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice and Minister for Training and Skills
    The Honourable Yvette D'Ath

    Tuesday, September 13, 2016

    Australia’s toughest laws to tackle serious organised crime

    The Palaszczuk Government has introduced the legislation that will give Queensland the toughest organised crime regime in the country.

    Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the laws honoured a commitment made before the 2015 State election and would enable law enforcement agencies to tackle all forms of serious organised crime, including those involved with child exploitation, boiler-room fraudsters and outlaw criminal motorcycle gangs by focusing on people’s criminal activity, rather than a focus on any individual group.

    "These laws will be the most comprehensive organised crime laws in the country.  They will focus on all forms of organised crime – not just one. We will do more to tackle the problems of illicit drugs and the horrific crimes of child exploitation," the Premier said.

    Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath said the Taskforce report into Organised Crime Legislation gave prominence to the risks posed by ‘less structured’ organised crime groups, which can be camouflaged and adaptable while still posing a serious threat to the public.

    “The LNP’s VLAD laws have proven to be ill-conceived and vulnerable to challenge, but they are also not designed to tackle the full spectrum of organised crime” said Mrs D’Ath.

    Under the Palaszczuk Government’s reforms, a new consorting offence will be created to prevent and deter convicted criminals from establishing, building and maintaining criminal networks.

    Transitional provisions will be established to ensure a seamless shift to the new Serious Organised Crime regime.

    “Consorting orders have been proven to be constitutionally sound in other jurisdictions, and unlike the LNP’s rushed laws, they are able to secure convictions,” said Mrs D’Ath.

    "We’ve also ensured Queensland’s consorting orders won’t be used against vulnerable groups in society.

    “This will be done by limiting their use to cases involving adults convicted of serious indictable offences punishable by a maximum of at least five years imprisonment, or some other indictable offences often linked to organised crime, such as riot.”

    The Palaszczuk Government’s suite of organised crime legislation will also introduce a Public Safety Protection Order Scheme, capable of delivering a multi-level strike against organised crime.

    A Magistrate will be able to declare a premises to be a ‘Restricted Premises’ if there is a reasonable suspicion that prescribed unlawful conduct, criminal behaviour or anti-social behaviour is occurring, or where recognised offenders or anyone issued with a consorting warning is present.

    Such a declaration means that police can search the premises without a warrant at any time and seize property, which is automatically forfeited to the State.

    Owners and occupiers who continue to allow that conduct to occur commit serious criminal offences.

    Police will be empowered to issue a ‘stop and desist’ fortification notice when they observe premises that are habitually occupied by recognised offenders or participants in criminal organisation becoming excessively fortified.

    The Serious and Organised Crime Amendment Bill will go through a proper parliamentary committee process for consideration, with the aim the parliament can vote on the package of measures by the end of the year.

    Media contact:

    • Kirby Anderson (Premier’s office) 0417 263 791
    • Geoff Breusch (Attorney-General’s office) 0417 272 875