Skip links and keyboard navigation

    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for State Development and Minister for Natural Resources and Mines
    The Honourable Anthony Lynham

    Councils take driver’s seat on stock routes

    Minister for State Development and Minister for Natural Resources and Mines
    The Honourable Anthony Lynham

    Thursday, July 30, 2015

    Councils take driver’s seat on stock routes

    Local councils will be able to manage their local stock routes and collect the funds graziers already pay to use them under proposed changes to Queensland’s state land administration.

    Minister for State Development and Minister for Natural Resources and Mines Dr Anthony Lynham announced the changes at the AgForce State Conference in Toowoomba today.
     
    “Councils currently authorise livestock movement on our 2.6 million hectares and 72,000 km of stock routes by issuing travel permits and short-term grazing permits,” he said.

     “Stock routes will remain primarily a vital source of pasture for travelling stock, emergency agistment and short-term grazing, but there’s so much more councils will be able to do.

     “Under proposed changes, graziers will pay councils for their grazing permits, not the State Government as they do now.

     “Councils will then be able to use those funds to manage stock routes and invest in improved pest and weed control, protect the environment and reduce fire risks.

     “As well, it will be the actual users of the routes who will be paying for their maintenance and management now, rather than all of the ratepayers in the council’s area.

     “Other planned changes such as removing the requirement on councils to have a stock route management plan will also reduce the regulatory burden and free up resources to divert into better managing their local priorities. ”

     Dr Lynham said legislation would be developed in consultation with AgForce, the Local Government Association of Queensland for introduction to Parliament early next year.

     The stock route changes are the first tranche of a future suite of land administration changes to simplify and modernise Queensland’s state land administration framework.

     Dr Lynham said government would continue to work with including drovers, graziers, Indigenous groups, conservation groups, AgForce and councils to modernise the state’s 20th century land administration framework,

     “Local councils play a key role in administering and managing state land, including Queensland’s vast road and stock route network and reserves for community purposes,” he said.

     “The Palaszczuk Government will continue to listen to industry, local government and communities statewide to build a modern state land system that supports sustainable economic growth and prosperous and thriving communities.”

    For more information on state land reform visit dnrm.qld.gov.au and search for land initiatives.

     ENDS            30 July 2015

     Media contact:           Jan Martin     0439 341 314