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    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    JOINT STATEMENT
    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk
    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Queensland's koalas to be listed as vulnerable

    JOINT STATEMENT

    Premier and Minister for the Arts
    The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk

    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Sunday, May 31, 2015

    Queensland's koalas to be listed as vulnerable

    Queensland’s iconic marsupial, the koala, will soon be listed as 'vulnerable' across the state.

    Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced the decision today at the Daisy Hill Koala Centre’s 20th anniversary celebrations, alongside Environment and Heritage Protection Minister Steven Miles, Member for Springwood Mick de Brenni and Member for Capalaba Don Brown. 

    Ms Palaszczuk said her Government was putting science at the centre of its decisions and had accepted the recommendation of the Species Technical Committee, an independent panel of scientists, to lift the conservation status of the koala.

    "This decision, which is driven by scientific evidence, will bring Queensland's koala classification in line with the Commonwealth,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

    “Currently, koalas are only listed as vulnerable in south east Queensland.

    “This decision will apply the “vulnerable” status across the State.

    "The koala is an iconic species that faces many threats including climate change, habitat reduction, disease, motor vehicle strike and attacks by dogs.

    “The reclassification will mean that more consideration will need to be given to koala habitats across Queensland, particularly in regard to potential impacts from development and resource activities.”

    Dr Steven Miles said the decision would be welcomed by koala lovers and conservationists, and bring renewed focus to the koala’s plight.

    He said the Daisy Hill Koala Centre had been instrumental in shaping visitors’ awareness and understanding of Australia’s most popular native animal for the last 20 years.

    “Thanks to Daisy Hill’s dedicated staff and its resident koalas, generations of Queenslanders have been inspired to take an active role in protecting and caring for our unique wildlife,” he said.

    “From today that will be even easier with a new web-based app that will empower users to become directly involved in species conservation.

    “Spot Our Species allows people to contribute photos of wildlife sightings to the Atlas of Living Australia, a national database of all known native species, and access detailed information on species, threats and actions to help make a difference.

    “Users will also be able to connect with local community groups and get involved with conservation work in their own backyards.

    “The initiative aims to increase awareness and understanding of the role that each of us can play in conserving our precious wildlife, such as the koala, for generations to come,” Dr Miles said.

    Spot Our Species is easily accessed at www.qld.gov.au/environment/plants-animals/conservation.

    Media contact: 0437 533 172