Skip links and keyboard navigation

    Media Statements

    Coat of ArmsMedia Release
    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Springbrook Bridge opens as Purling Brook Falls puts on show

    Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef
    The Honourable Steven Miles

    Tuesday, March 10, 2015

    Springbrook Bridge opens as Purling Brook Falls puts on show

    A new suspension bridge below Purling Brook Falls has been officially opened in Springbrook National Park in the Gold Coast hinterland, giving walkers a superb view upstream to the 110-metre falls currently in full flow. 

    National Parks Minister Dr Steven Miles said the $780,000 bridge over Little Nerang Creek had been designed built to have minimal impact on the World Heritage Area in which it is located. 

    As well as the new bridge, 160 metres of new walking track has been built, enabling the popular Purling Brook circuit to be reopened. 

    Dr Miles said the new bridge had been named in honour of late Springbrook-based Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service ranger John Stacey. 

    “John was a well-liked and highly respected ranger who had a long history with Springbrook Plateau – it was the area he called home, and where he raised his children. 

    “John was a qualified builder before becoming a ranger and, while working as a contractor for QPWS, delivered large construction projects such as lookouts at Sylvester’s, Coomera and Witches Falls. 

    “The decision to name the bridge in John’s honour is one that will no doubt be supported by both QPWS staff and the Springbrook community.” 

    Dr Miles said the bridge provided an excellent experience for visitors to the national park.

    “When visitors walk down to the bridge – about a 90 minute round trip – they can enjoy the new vantage point that the bridge offers. 

    “There are views upstream to the Purling Brook Falls which are in full flow pumping after recent rains, and downstream to smaller falls and cascades.” 

    Dr Miles said avoiding landslip-prone cliffs meant it was no longer possible to walk under the waterfall, but the experience of being on the bridge and enjoying double vista views upstream and downstream more than made up for it. 

    Landslides on the eastern side of the gorge closed the Purling Brook circuit in 2012, followed by further rock falls in 2013 which resulted in permanent closure, until now. 

    “It wasn’t sustainable to keep putting this popular track back in the same location only to see more landslips undo all the hard work,” Dr Miles said. 

    “The eastern and western tracks are linked once again, and it’s a beautiful walk with a wonderful contrast of both rainforest and eucalypt forest. 

    “Local business owners will be looking forward to the bridge boosting the number of visitors to Springbrook,” he said. 

    More information about Springbrook National Park is at http://www.nprsr.qld.gov.au/parks/springbrook/index.html 

    ENDS 

    Media contact: 3719 7336 or 0437 533 172

    Additional images and footage of the helilifts involved in bridge construction can be made available upon request.